West Yorkshire Worst For Driving Offences

Mon 19th Jul 2021

Analysis of dangerous driving offences by one of the UK’s leading insurance providers has found that motorists in West Yorkshire are most likely to commit an offence.

The data published by A-Plan Insurance this week looked at the regions of England and Wales and broke down each district’s population based on the police force attached to it. According to the study there were 515,758 motoring offences in England and Wales in 2020, and 431,573 of those offences were related to dangerous driving. West Yorkshire topped the list with 34,862, which with a population of 2,332,500 is an offence for one person is 67. Other dangerous areas of England and Wales include South Wales, where there is 68 people per offence and Lincolnshire which has 76 people per offence.

Dangerous driving offences include driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol and incidents like driving while using a mobile phone.

 

UK’s Most Dangerous Areas To Drive

 

 

Dangerous Driving Offences

Population (as of 2020)

# people per offence

Percentage of accidents to population

Index Rank

West Yorkshire

34,862

2,332,500

67

1.49%

1

South Wales

19,707

1,339,400

68

1.47%

2

Lincolnshire

10,004

761,200

76

1.31%

3

Sussex

20,129

1,712,100

85

1.18%

4

Avon & Somerset

19,053

1,719,000

90

1.11%

5

Gwent

6,574

594,200

90

1.11%

6

West Mercia

14,222

1,291,600

91

1.10%

7

North Wales

7,279

699,600

96

1.04%

8

Lancashire

15,125

1,508,900

100

1.00%

9

Dyfed-Powys

5,045

519,700

103

0.97%

1

 

At the other end of the scale, Wiltshire came out tops with the equivalent of one offence for every 277 people, with the sleepy hamlets of Surrey also a safe place to drive with 4,408 offences for a population of 1,196,200. Perhaps surprisingly Greater Manchester was third on the list with a 0.40% percentage of accidents to population.

The statistics, which came from a Department of Justice report found that offences by men outweighed those by women by a ratio of almost 4:1, and there was a shocking 2,786 dangerous driving offences by those under 17.